This site is no longer maintained and has been left for archival purposes

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INTRODUCTION

THE REALLY EASY STATISTICS SITE

Produced by Jim Deacon

Biology Teaching Organisation, University of Edinburgh

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I have produced this site, as someone who uses statistics in my experimental work, but I am not a statistician. The site is intended to provide a simple, straightforward guide to the basics of experimental design and to some of the common statistical tests.

There are several excellent sites on Statistical methods. But I think that many undergraduates (and graduate students) want only a user-friendly beginner's guide - or a refresher course - that enables them to use statistical tests with a minimum of fuss. That's the aim of this site. It is by no means a comprehensive guide, but it will get you started and, if nothing more, it will help you to understand the meaning of the symbols you see in scientific papers.

You can use this site in 2 ways:

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CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION always brings you back to this page
THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD
Experimental design
Designing experiments with statistics in mind
Common statistical terms
Descriptive statistics: standard deviation, standard error, confidence intervals of mean.

WHAT TEST DO I NEED?

STATISTICAL TESTS:
Student's t-test for comparing the means of two samples
Paired-samples test. (like a t-test, but used when data can be paired)
Analysis of variance for comparing means of three or more samples:

Chi-squared test for categories of data
Poisson distribution for count data
Correlation coefficient and regression analysis for line fitting:

TRANSFORMATION of data: percentages, logarithms, probits and arcsin values

STATISTICAL TABLES:
t (Student's t-test)
F, p = 0.05 (Analysis of Variance)
F, p = 0.01 (Analysis of Variance)
F, p = 0.001 (Analysis of Variance)
c2 (chi squared)
r (correlation coefficient)
Q (Multiple Range test)
Fmax (test for homogeneity of variance)

 

This site is no longer maintained and has been left for archival purposes

Text and links may be out of date