This site is no longer maintained and has been left for archival purposes

Text and links may be out of date

NORTH AMERICAN DESERTS GALLERY

NORTH AMERICAN DESERTS

The North American deserts (USA and Mexico) are grouped into four main types, which differ in their seasonal climate, elevation, topography, patterns of rainfall, and soils. These differences are reflected in the contrasting plant and animal communities of these regions.

Click on an image below for a relevant page or go to NORTH AMERICAN DESERTS for more details.

GREAT BASIN DESERT
Cold winters, dry, dominated by shrubs (sagebrush, saltbush) and grasses

SONORAN DESERT

See also:
Baja California
and
Pinacate Biosphere Reserve
Warm, subtropical; twice-yearly rainfall. Dominated by creosote bush, but many large cacti and nitrogen-fixing trees in upland regions

Sonoran, USA

Volcanic, Pinacate
Sonoran, USA

Baja California

MOJAVE DESERT

Transitional between the Great Basin and Sonoran desert, but with some distinctive plants such as the Joshua tree in upland regions. Receives winter rainfall.

CHIHUAHUAN DESERT

Characterised by hot summers (with summer rains), cold winters and lime-rich soils. Contains many small cacti and cold-tolerant plants such as agaves and yuccas.

This site is no longer maintained and has been left for archival purposes

Text and links may be out of date